Yang,

 

                Just to clarify what you’re asking even further, what about a bilingual version of Chaucer that includes both the modern English and the Middle English? What would your preferred 700’s look like?

 

Stephen T. Early (he/him/his)

Cataloger

Technical Services

Center for Research Libraries

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From: Program for Cooperative Cataloging [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Yang Wang
Sent: Friday, August 14, 2020 3:17 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: [PCCLIST] Authorized access point to an expressions (NACO Training Module 6, RDA 6.27.3 and RDA 6.11.1.3)

 

Hi,

 

Sometimes when a pair of expressions of a work (e.g., a bilingual edition) is needed in a bib, one witness see two different practices, 1) LC’s way of using the work-level authority record as a substitute, and 2) PCC’s way of minting a new expression-level authority record. It is quite clear that PCC catalogers, other than those at LC, are encouraged to follow Practice#2. But I also realize, and I have witnessed often, that some PCC institutions prefer following LC’s own “cost-cutting” practice, since no library, not even LC, gets FED’s helicopter money! Regardless, this is what we have been doing under RDA.  

 

For a bilingual edition of Chaucer’s Canterbury tales, following Practice#1, one would give a pair of 700s like this:

 

700 12 $i Container of (expression): $a Chaucer, Geoffrey, ‡d -1400. ‡t Canterbury tales.

700 12 $i Container of (expression): $a Chaucer, Geoffrey, ‡d -1400. ‡t Canterbury tales. $l German.

 

Those who follow Practice#2 would give:

 

700 12 $i Container of (expression): $a Chaucer, Geoffrey, ‡d -1400. ‡t Canterbury tales. $l English.

700 12 $i Container of (expression): $a Chaucer, Geoffrey, ‡d -1400. ‡t Canterbury tales. $l German.

 

Or perhaps like this*:  

 

700 12 $i Container of (expression): $a Chaucer, Geoffrey, ‡d -1400. ‡t Canterbury tales. $l English (Middle English)

700 12 $i Container of (expression): $a Chaucer, Geoffrey, ‡d -1400. ‡t Canterbury tales. $l German.

 

*“For the early form of a modern language that is found in an inverted form, use the early form in direct order within parentheses following the modern language (e.g., for "French, Old (ca. 842-1400)," use "French (Old French)")”--LC/PCC PS on RDA 6.11.1.3.

 

I would like to know which language qualifier is preferable, English or English (Middle English). The former or the latter?

 

Any clarification of this will be much appreciated. Also, would be possible to add a footnote to Slides 170 or 171 of NACO training module#6, with a reference to LC/PCC PS 6.11.1.3 (“Recording language of expression)? I know the training modules get used/download often and are being updated constantly.

 

Thanks for your time!

 

Yang