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I took the discussions we had and sent them to the SongKong forum. Here’s the useful response I got. It should help people in a number of situations as they look to keep a handle on future duplicates whenever an archive or collection grows. Especially:

1. If many tracks are not in English (or use Latin characters [bad use of the negative])
2. If the user works on a Mac (because everything Microsoft makes is hard, ugly, and viral [in the bad sense]:)
3 If they’re working with materials obscure enough to bypass mainstream metadata banks like MusicBrainz

https://community.jthink.net/t/merging-folders-and-then-files/9711

Sent from my iPad

> On Jan 15, 2021, at 9:49 AM, Richard L. Hess <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> Hi, Stuart,
> 
> This sounds very interesting! Please keep us posted on your results. I was using the "Use Tools That You Already Have" method of solving the problem, but this sounds ideal!
> 
> Cheers,
> 
> Richard
> 
> 
>> On 2021-01-15 7:09 a.m., ROBINSON Stuart wrote:
>> One method I am coincidentally testing just now is using quickhash-gui
>>  https://www.quickhash-gui.org/download/quickhash-v1-5-6-for-windows/
>>  I can use this to select a drive or folder, then scan and hash every file, when it has finished you can right click on the list to "Show only duplicates" then right click again to export that selection to a CSV file, it shows name, path, file size, and file hash.
>>  It can take a while to scan but it seems very good so far from my testing.
>>  Best, stuart
> 
> -- 
> Richard L. Hess                   email: [log in to unmask]
> Aurora, Ontario, Canada                             647 479 2800
> http://www.richardhess.com/tape/contact.htm
> Track Format - Speed - Equalization - Azimuth - Noise Reduction
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