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Yes, it goes back to the overlap between success on the (music hall) stage and on early recordings

https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-030-47941-1 This just came out: hopefully you have access to a library that subscribes? Coz otherwise pricey...

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> On Jan 28, 2021, at 10:40 AM, Rob Bamberger <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> ´╗┐Hi Corey --
> 
> That's right about the gender distinction. What I'm raising is why
> performers whom we do not think of as comics, but as a singer, might be
> described as a "comedian" or "comedienne" on the label. For example, the
> Victor label on the Bioswell Sisters' first recording made in New Orleans
> describes them as "Comedians."
> 
> On Thu, Jan 28, 2021 at 1:34 PM Corey Bailey <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> 
>> I've always thought that 'Comedian' referred to a male comic & that
>> 'Comedienne' referred to a female comic. I could be wrong though....
>> 
>> Be safe,
>> 
>> CB
>> 
>> Corey Bailey Audio Engineering
>> www.baileyzone.net
>> 
>> On 1/28/2021 10:03 AM, Rob Bamberger wrote:
>>>  "Comedian" and "Comedienne" as artist designations on record labels
>> into
>>> the 1920s? It's  a use of these words in a broader context than the
>>> conventional sense. Was it meant simply to identify someone as a
>> "popular"
>>> rather than classical or "serious" artist? Is it meant to be associated
>>> with performers who might be seen in vaudeville or theater who had acts
>>> that combined some comic patter or exchange, followed by song (or dance).
>>> Is there a precise intention that has been written about, or discovered
>> in
>>> primary materials?
>>> Thanks for your comments.
>>> Rob