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Greetings,

The previously announced call for papers for _Language Documentation
Collections: Assessment and Recognition_ is being extended to at least
October 2021.

There is an online event September 2nd 11AM-12 (noon) EST.
https://forms.gle/cpcDMeEVsBMR1E4q6

Additional communication with the editors is encouraged.


***Overview***
 Language Documentation is an interdisciplinary approach to creating
multi-purpose collections that exhibit and support language use—often for
languages used by ethno-linguistic minorities. These collections are often
made as part of linguistic work. However, many ethno-linguistic collections
are created by people outside of linguistics.

We are seeking papers which address issues on how these collections should
be assessed as part of scholarly work and how recognition should be given
for the curation of these collections as part of scholarly work.  See the
linked full call for a list of specific issues.

We are interested in presenting a broad range of perspectives in this
collection.


*** Details***
Deadline: October 31st, 2021
Full call: https://l.linklyhq.com/l/NW3J
Journal announcement:
https://openhumanitiesdata.metajnl.com/announcement/#:~:text=Language%20Documentation%20Collections

*** Venue***
Accepted papers will be published in a special collection within the
Journal of Open Humanities Data

*** About the Guest Editors ***

Richard Griscom is a researcher at Leiden University Centre for
Linguistics. His research focuses on the documentation and description of
endangered languages, with an emphasis on the languages of East Africa, and
the development of digital data collection and processing methods for
researchers working in resource-constrained environments.

Lauren B. Collister is a faculty librarian and the Director of the Office
of Scholarly Communication and Publishing for the University of Pittsburgh
Library System. Her research background in sociolinguistics focuses on
language change, identity, and online communication. Her current work
focuses on reproducibility, open scholarship, data management, and
intellectual property in linguistics research.

Hugh J. Paterson III is a Scholar at the University of Oregon with a
background in language documentation in Nigeria and Mexico. He has worked
in accessions and digitization at a language archive, and as a user
interaction designer for digital experiences. He is interested in
leveraging language technology for the benefit of language communities and
in the ways they desire to see their language used.